Subsistence Fishing

The commercial salmon fishing season in Bristol Bay isn't open yet but subsistence fishing for food is allowed for Alaska residents before the commercial season opens. This doesn't mean that you can fish any where and any time you want. There are regulations and limits, and you can't sell fish caught in a subsistence fishery. What it does mean is if you are motivated to do so you can fish for food for your family.

Some people set their net from the beach today and are hoping for some yummy salmon. Here are a few pictures of the action.

 

Setting the net, looking back at the shore

Setting the net, looking back at the shore

The net is set, looking out to the Nushigak River

The net is set, looking out to the Nushigak River

Katherine and Tyonne, two friends who fish the Bay

Katherine and Tyonne, two friends who fish the Bay

With the net set, it's 'hurry up and wait' time while the net soaks. Now it is up to the fish to do their part...

You can learn more about subsistence fishing from the  Frequently Asked Questions page on the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADFG) website.  

Here is a bit more about subsistence fishing for you until you get a chance to go over to the ADFG website, "The Alaska Department of Fish and Game recognizes the definition of subsistence fishing to mean the taking of, fishing for, or possession of fish, shellfish, or other fisheries resources by a resident of the state for subsistence uses with gillnet, seine, fish wheel, long line, or other means defined by the Board of Fisheries."

The ADFG website also says, "Subsistence is defined in Alaska state laws as the 'noncommercial customary and traditional uses' of fish and wildlife...The primary requirement for participation in subsistence fishing or hunting is Alaska residency, which is defined as having lived in Alaska for 12 consecutive months."