Two ways to catch Bristol Bay Salmon

Sometimes sunrise on Bristol Bay leaves you with grey low hung clouds heavy with rain. Or fog so thick you can't see the other boats working their nets around you.

In Bristol Bay, commercial salmon fishing is done either by drift gillnetting or by setnetting. If you fish using a setnet, your net is anchored on shore and extended out into the water where another anchor holds it off shore. The fish that swim into the net on the rising tide are caught in the net and the crew picks them out of the net. Setnetters live on the beach near where their setnet site is located. These areas are even more remote than Dillingham and the only community they have is the one they build themselves. Shacks, tents and other small structures make up the homes and workspaces for the setnetters. They stay there pretty much until the last fish is caught and the fishing season finished.  If you get seasick setnetting might be the perfect thing for you. 

I fish from my boat, F/V Potential, as part of the drift gillnet fleet. We are on the water and one of our goals is not to end up on land! With crazy tides that rise and fall 30' twice a day, the distance from the bottom of you boat to the bottom of the bay constantly changing. 

To fish from a boat using a drift gill net, you throw a buoy from the boat that is attached to one end of your net. The net is unfurled from the reel on your boat as you pull away from the buoy. Once fully extended, the net hangs in the water column, suspended by corks (floats) and fish are caught as they swim into the net. Sounds easy enough but everyone else is out there with their boats, nets and crew doing the same thing. It can get tight and often tense as you try to keep boats from colliding and nets from getting tangled in each other.  And remember, you are always moving with the tide that can really rip, sometimes as much as 4 knots.  With the tide my boat only does 10 knots maximum. 

One of the worst things that can happen when you are gillnetting is to have someone (another boat) or something (a whale, drifting log, etc.) run over or through your net. It sucks for all involved and is an expensive loss of gear and fishing time. In the earlier blog called Preseason: hanging net while you hurry up and wait you saw fishermen working on their nets to get ready for the first commercial salmon fishing season opening. It takes a lot of time patience and skill to hang gear. It is hard to be patient if you are back on land mending a net midseason instead of fishing because of an incident on the water.

 

As for boats banging into each other on the water, you try to avoid that too. But sometimes the tide, wind and chop combine and take control of the situation out of your hands. That's when the protective skirt of rubber buoys that is lashed to the rail of most boats is your best friend. It protects your boat and other boats. Buoys are both a common courtesy and insurance plan.

 

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From the Fishing Grounds of Bristol Bay

The last few weeks have been all about fishing. It was lucky that we flew to Dillinghham, AK early to get a jump on preseason boat work and begin filming. The fish came back sooner than expected this year and if we hadn't been here already we would have missed out on some great fishing. You never know what is going to happen year to year - late fish, early fish, lots of fish, no fish or you are just not in the right place at the right time.

The weather started out wild with winds gusting to 70 knots. There were waves breaking over the boat on the day this picture was taken. The boat landed hard coming off a huge wave and put my weight on the wheel to brace myself. The steering wheel broke off in my hands. Can honestly say I have never had that happen before!

 

Elijah and his salty new Alaska beard holding up the wheel of fortune - fortunate that the wheel was all that broke!


Elijah and his salty new Alaska beard holding up the wheel of fortune - fortunate that the wheel was all that broke!

The galley on the F/V Potential is a multipurpose space!

The galley on the F/V Potential is a multipurpose space!

Ugashik mountains - the work is hard but the scenery is awesome!

Ugashik mountains - the work is hard but the scenery is awesome!

Gillnet boats fishing the Ugashik River

Gillnet boats fishing the Ugashik River

Fred Reeves has been fishing Bristol Bay with me for seven years now. When he isn't fishing he can be found running the Brick House Cafe, his San Francisco restaurant. While Fred is in Alaska Kim Kobasic, restaurant co-owner and Fred's sweetie, holds it all together with her capable hands.

Each year Fred flies Bristol Bay sockeye and king salmon home to California serve at his restaurant. His family cattle ranch is the source for the Wagyu 'Kobe' Beef that is house roasted and smoked. How's that for surf and turf? Hungry yet? Here's a link to the Brick House Cafe website: http://www.brickhousesf.com

 

Fred Reeves, owner of the Brick House Cafe and crew member on F/V Potential. 

Fred Reeves, owner of the Brick House Cafe and crew member on F/V Potential. 

And this is Daniel Strong, the third crew member on the F/V Potential. It's Daniel's first season fishing but it seems to be working out for him. He doesn't get seasick which is more than I can say for myself! All these years, all these fishing seasons and I still 'feed' the fish occasionally.  It will be interesting to get Daniel's take on fishing Bristol Bay at the end of the season...

Daniel Strong, first year crew member on the Potential

Daniel Strong, first year crew member on the Potential

The tide goes out in Bristol Bay incredibly quick and the bottom comes up fast. You have to watch to make sure you still have water under your boat if you want to go anywhere between tide changes. It seems obvious but it can surprise you. You can see in the two pictures below the same piece of exposed mud looks different depending on way you approach it and the time of day. What is obviously mud in daylight looks likes a wave in the low light of dusk. That could really screw things up for you if think you are looking at water and land stuck in what is actually mud. Tired eyes after days of fishing and low light can do that to you.

Afternoon light shows the mud to its best advantage

Afternoon light shows the mud to its best advantage

Low light and a different angle on the same mud can trick your eyes

Low light and a different angle on the same mud can trick your eyes

Boats dry on the beach in Dago Creek, Ugashik. Your guess is as good as mine if this was a mistake or a planned break.

Boats dry on the beach in Dago Creek, Ugashik. Your guess is as good as mine if this was a mistake or a planned break.

Dago Creek once the tide has turned and everyone floats again.

Dago Creek once the tide has turned and everyone floats again.

Preview of Tails from Bristol Bay available!

It is very exciting to share that Filming Part One: Bristol Bay Preseason, a preview of Tails from Bristol Bay, is now available on the Preview page of the film's website!

When Randall Peck, Director of Photography, got back from two weeks of filming with Elijah Lawson in Alaska he put together a one minute clip to give us a feel for what it is like to get a fishing boat ready for the coming Bristol Bay fishing season. Filming Part One: Bristol Bay Preseason  captures the faces and places shoreside before the fleet takes to the water. Check it out on the website and let us know what you think! 

Two days left! EPA needs to hear Bristol Bay matters

Comment by June 30th! http://bit.ly/EPA-BristolBay

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting comments from the public on the environmental impact statement (EIS) that was release for Bristol Bay. The EIS considers what the impacts of the proposed Pebble Mine would be on the Bristol Bay watershed and all that lives, breaths, grows, swims and flows through it. In short, the report say the Pebble Mine is not good! Bad for fish, water and the pristine environment that is Bristol Bay.

The link that is provided will take you to Earthworks webpage where you can learn more about the Pebble Mine issue and make your comment to the EPA. Commenting only takes a minute and will do so much good. Thank you for considering taking part in protecting Bristol Bay. http://bit.ly/EPA-BristolBay

Speaking of Earthworks, they found the Tails From Bristol Bay website and asked to use this picture of Elijah. With the added text the image of Elijah on F/V Potential is helping to spread the word! 

Elijah Lawson on F/V Potential in Bristol Bay

Elijah Lawson on F/V Potential in Bristol Bay

Time to go fish!

No more hurry up and wait! The fish are showing up early this year. Its a big rush to get out to the fishing grounds. Elijah and the F/V Potential will be out at the fishing grounds away from internet. However, there will be some updates when we are in range. Stay tuned for fishing updates and shots of the action on the water from the Bristol Bay 2013 season...

The crew from F/V Potential (from the left) Daniel Strong (and he is) Elijah Lawson, and Freddy Reeves.

The crew from F/V Potential (from the left) Daniel Strong (and he is) Elijah Lawson, and Freddy Reeves.

David from F/V Winter Blues working to get the boat ready for an early salmon run.

David from F/V Winter Blues working to get the boat ready for an early salmon run.

Lots of action around the boat yard. Nothing gets people moving like hearing that the fish are showing up early.

Lots of action around the boat yard. Nothing gets people moving like hearing that the fish are showing up early.

Freddy squeezes into the lazarete to stow away some very valuable goods - the beer!

Freddy squeezes into the lazarete to stow away some very valuable goods - the beer!

You can see how small the space is that Freddy had to climb into. Whatever it takes...

You can see how small the space is that Freddy had to climb into. Whatever it takes...

It's a wrap for Randy

Randall Peck, director of photography for Tails from Bristol Bay, flew out after an epic week of shooting the people and places of Bristol Bay. Where would we be without people who love their work, take it serious and have serious fun doing it? Thank you for the long hours and good work.

If you want to read more about Randy and some of the projects he has worked on here is a link to his website: http://randallpeck.com

Time for me to turn some thoughts toward getting F/V Potential off of the hard and into the water. I hear there are kings out there just waiting to be caught...

Randy heads south. 

Randy heads south. 

Randy + 8 bags at check in

Randy + 8 bags at check in

One last look at the camera that captured all the stories, sights and sounds that will become the film.

One last look at the camera that captured all the stories, sights and sounds that will become the film.

F/V Potential standing by for the splash

F/V Potential standing by for the splash

The boatyard welcome mat

The boatyard welcome mat

Every interview we do teaches me more...

Every interview we do teaches me more about the people who work here in Bristol Bay. It’s funny that I've worked along side some of the people whom we’ve spoken with on camera. Yet I'm suprised about how little I really know about them and their background.  It’s been so interesting to learn about how Jerry Liboff gave up graduate school studying economics to live in Alaska. Robert washed dishes at the Muddy Rudder restaurant in Dillingham and then lived in Tent city until he got a job crewing. He’s now one of the most prolific fishermen in the Bay. Genevia retired as a teacher and now runs the boat with her grandchildren.  I’m blown away with the sophistication of this group of fishers. I’ve learned about peoples humble start to the fisheries and now how they are such seasoned veterans. I’ve heard stories of boats being passed down from generation to generation kept in the family for decades and hopefully passed on for decades more. One thing becomes very clear, we are all in the same boat. The salmon are the blood flowing through the veins of the rivers. The salmon feed the earth, the animals and the people. The salmon is the life force in Bristol Bay Alaska.

This series of pictures was taken at Lake Aleknagik. Midnight into the early morning provided us with still water and inky skies that just don't go dark enough at this time of year to see the stars.

 

Lake Aleknagik at 12:30 am

Lake Aleknagik at 12:30 am

1 am on the lake for some really cool footage of the Alaskan sunset

1 am on the lake for some really cool footage of the Alaskan sunset

No boat is too small for E to skipper

No boat is too small for E to skipper

My view of Lake Aleknagik while steering the skiff back to shore at 5 am. Glassy. You can see the pebbles at the bottom of the lake in this picture.

My view of Lake Aleknagik while steering the skiff back to shore at 5 am. Glassy. You can see the pebbles at the bottom of the lake in this picture.

Back on the shore of Lake Aleknagik at 5 am. Just up the hill to a long awaited sleep.

Back on the shore of Lake Aleknagik at 5 am. Just up the hill to a long awaited sleep.

We stayed with the Mershon's at the Silver Fin B&B on the Lake. Don't let any fisherman tell you he or she doesn't enjoy a real bed once in a while! 

The best night of sleep in Alaska at the Silver Fin B and B

The best night of sleep in Alaska at the Silver Fin B and B

The Dana Dolley hung out with the Mershon’s while we were out shooting from the skiff.

The Dana Dolley hung out with the Mershon’s while we were out shooting from the skiff.

This was so much more comfortable than our boat or container/production office; it was luxurious.

This was so much more comfortable than our boat or container/production office; it was luxurious.

Tired Hunter Mershon after a hard day at play. Sweet dreams...

Tired Hunter Mershon after a hard day at play. Sweet dreams...

Shafted, but in a good way...part two

This blog started in 'Shafted but in a good way' on June 4th. Details of the project can be found there. It is the same thing we are doing in this project blog post but in reverse.

The shaft was finished at the machine shop. This series shows the reinstall of the new and improved shaft. Good to have F/V Potential back in one piece!

One machined shaft, on its way back to where it belongs

One machined shaft, on its way back to where it belongs

One time when banging on something is just the right thing to do.

One time when banging on something is just the right thing to do.

Overhand technique in the previous shot and underhand in this one.

Overhand technique in the previous shot and underhand in this one.

In one hand the magic elixer - marine grade anti-sieze. In the other - what is it any way?

In one hand the magic elixer - marine grade anti-sieze. In the other - what is it any way?

They all came out, all have to go back in. Question: is the job a success if the shaft is back in and there is one screw left on the table? Just kidding! 

They all came out, all have to go back in. Question: is the job a success if the shaft is back in and there is one screw left on the table? Just kidding! 

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And the final screw goes back in. Done.

And the final screw goes back in. Done.

This blog was brought to you the tools of the trade

This blog was brought to you the tools of the trade

Okay, shaft off the list. Next?

Okay, shaft off the list. Next?

N140AK

Randy and I flew up over the Nushagak Watershed with Russell Nelson. No more words (except captions). These pictures speak for themselves. Oh, by the way, N140AK is the registration number on the tail of Russell's plane. 

Morning sun glints of Russell's plane

Morning sun glints of Russell's plane

A long shadow shot and the profile of our sweet ride

A long shadow shot and the profile of our sweet ride

Preflight check...

Preflight check...

Control panel in the plane's dash, turn the key, flip some switches, adjust some knobs...

Control panel in the plane's dash, turn the key, flip some switches, adjust some knobs...

...and Russell takes us away from it all.

...and Russell takes us away from it all.

Spreading out under the wings of N140AK we had the perfect morning for our flight 

Spreading out under the wings of N140AK we had the perfect morning for our flight 

The Nushagak Watershed. These are the rivers where the salmon have returned to spawn every year for thousands of years. The habitat is pristine and the water clear and cold. It is threaded ornately with rivers...

The Nushagak Watershed. These are the rivers where the salmon have returned to spawn every year for thousands of years. The habitat is pristine and the water clear and cold. It is threaded ornately with rivers...

...and spotted with pools, ponds and lakes. This is why our salmon make there way back every year.  

...and spotted with pools, ponds and lakes. This is why our salmon make there way back every year.  

The morning light made everything out one window glint with silver and out the other glow with gold. It is precious. 

The morning light made everything out one window glint with silver and out the other glow with gold. It is precious. 

The Production Office, an inside job

We have a 40ft shipping container that we’ve sectioned off into twenty feet of net and tool storage, ten feet of kitchenette, and ten feet of production office and living space. It’s amazing how you learn to live in such small spaces. This feel luxurious compared to living on the boat. We soak up our time in our lockers . This year our locker is also the production office. The film crew will be living out of this container during production, from June 6th-June 15th. Stay tuned for more from tailsfrombristolbay.com

 

Tails from Bristol Bay production office’s

Tails from Bristol Bay production office’s

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Crew quarters in production office

Crew quarters in production office

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Looking through the storage end to the productions end of our multi tasking container

Looking through the storage end to the productions end of our multi tasking container

Custom Paint job on production office

Custom Paint job on production office

Graffiti artist hard at work

Graffiti artist hard at work

How the magic happens

Wondering how the magic happens? Here's the answer - Our production gear. From the left to the right: Sennheiser MKH60 mic, Cannon t21 still and video camera, Go pro 3 x 2 with waterproof mounts, Waterproof housing for sony NEX 5, Sony F3 with mat box and monitor, Sony NEX 5 with wide angle lens, Timecode slate for sound syncing, Deva, Nomad sound mixer with 4 wireless mics. Mac laptop for downloads & viewing footage.

 

Tools of the trade

Tools of the trade

Sony f3 on the f/v Potential.

Sony f3 on the f/v Potential.

Sunset at the beach with Randy.

Sunset at the beach with Randy.

Our first King salmon on the BBQ, deeelisous!

Our first King salmon on the BBQ, deeelisous!

Up river to Koliganek with Gusty and his family

June 9th and 10th I flew up the Nushagak River to KoliganekIt's an hour plane ride in a puddle jumper. Once there, Randy and I spent two days on the Nushagak River filming with Gusty and his family. 

Koliganek is located at Latitude 59°43′44″N, Longitude 157°16′38″WIt was amazing. 

Here's a description of the Koliganek from the SWAMC website, "Koliganek is located on the left bank of the Nushagak River, and lies 65 miles northeast of Dillingham. Koliganek is a Yup’ik Eskimo village with Russian Orthodox practices. Subsistence activities are an important part of the lifestyle. The school and village organization provide most year-round employment. A new State-owned 3,000’ long by 75’ wide runway is available for aviation purposes." 

Okay, after a few basics facts, now on to an amazing array of photos from the last few days of filming in the boatyard in Dillingham and then on up in Koliganek. 

This time working in the boat yard is with a camera and not with a wrench, pry bar and brute force on seized boat parts.

This time working in the boat yard is with a camera and not with a wrench, pry bar and brute force on seized boat parts.

Randy using the Dana Dolly. Remember the Dana Dolly  description from the blog post on June 9th?

Randy using the Dana Dolly. Remember the Dana Dolly  description from the blog post on June 9th?

Randy filming in the boat yard

Randy filming in the boat yard

 Golden hour lasts for 6 hours up here! We want to call this one Golden Hour Productions...

 Golden hour lasts for 6 hours up here! We want to call this one Golden Hour Productions...

1:30 am. Is that early or is that late?

1:30 am. Is that early or is that late?

The skiffs are used for setnetting, transportation and hunting. Just like you use a car to go to work, pick up the kids and get groceries, same thing.  

The skiffs are used for setnetting, transportation and hunting. Just like you use a car to go to work, pick up the kids and get groceries, same thing.

 

We chartered a plane from Shannon’s Air to take us to Koliganek.

We chartered a plane from Shannon’s Air to take us to Koliganek.

Getting all the gear into a small plane. The plane holds eight people. Or seven and a outboard motor on the way home. Depends on the day.

Getting all the gear into a small plane. The plane holds eight people. Or seven and a outboard motor on the way home. Depends on the day.

On the way, Randy in the jump seat.

On the way, Randy in the jump seat.

The baby shot, Momma and baby (one month old) heads back to Manakotik.

The baby shot, Momma and baby (one month old) heads back to Manakotik.

Seasoned traveler already

Seasoned traveler already

 Control panel of our plane

 Control panel of our plane

In Flight up the Nushagak River. You can see the prop in the picture on the left.

In Flight up the Nushagak River. You can see the prop in the picture on the left.

 Mounting the Go Pro on the plane.

 Mounting the Go Pro on the plane.

Mounting the Go Pro on the plane with adult supervision.

Mounting the Go Pro on the plane with adult supervision.

Jr greets us at the airport

Jr greets us at the airport

Jr's kids catch air...

Jr's kids catch air...

 ...and run laps...

 ...and run laps...

 ...and levitate.

 ...and levitate.

The kids hangin' in house

The kids hangin' in house

The bear/pilot and me

The bear/pilot and me

That's me, flying back to Dillingham - I love this shit

That's me, flying back to Dillingham - I love this shit

Inside the production rig

Inside the production rig

Outside the production rig. This truck keeps us on the road.

Outside the production rig. This truck keeps us on the road.

First day of filming, Part two: climbing up

In the last post I told you that you would see more of the beach at Nushagak Point where we landed the skiff. Here it is and the sun is up. It burned away the gold and black of dawn leaving us with blue and white vaulted above us. I'll take it! 

On the beach at Nushigak

On the beach at Nushigak

Sometimes sunrise on Bristol Bay leaves you with grey with low hung clouds heavy with rain. Or fog that isn't so comforting to be in because you can't see the other boats working their nets around you. So if dawn finds you searching for your sunglasses a mid the rubble of detritus that collects on the galley table, one of the few flat spaces on a boat and annoyingly a catch all for everything, you are already on your way to a good day.

To recap from Part One of this blog, we left Dillingham at 5am on Friday, June 7th and skiffed out to Nushagak Point to film footage of the surrounding area. From the Point there is an amazing view and if you can gain a little elevation it only gets better. The Nushagak Point's elevation is 249 feet.

 

The top of Nushagak Point: Latitude. 58.94722°, Longitude. -158.49444° , Elevation. 76m

The top of Nushagak Point: Latitude. 58.94722°, Longitude. -158.49444° , Elevation. 76m

We carried quite a bit of production gear up the hill, 45 minutes to the top. Each of us had at least 50 lbs hanging off us including a Dana Dolly. A Dana Dolly is the device that allows a camera man to pan a scene smoothly by sliding camera attached to the Dana Dolly down a track. If you are not filming on a sound stage, you need to pack in all the equipment to the site you are filming. The trick is to bring only what you need and make sure you and the crew can carry it all. 

Carrying the Dana Dolly up to the top of Nugashak Point

Carrying the Dana Dolly up to the top of Nugashak Point

Balancing a Dana Dolly is an exact art. That's why we're horrible at it!

Balancing a Dana Dolly is an exact art. That's why we're horrible at it!

Once we reached the top of the Point we set up the Dana Dolly for the shoot. The track needs to level so when you slide the camera/dolly combo over the track the image stays level in the view finder of the camera. If the ground of the site you are shooting isn't level it can be challenging to set up the gear. Once we had the footage we wanted to capture from up on Nushagak Point we broke down the gear, packed it up and hiked back down to where we left the skiff on the beach. 

We knew the boat would be dry on the beach when we got back from the shoot. In order to leave Nushagak Point, the water would have to be high enough to float the boat off the beach for the skiff ride back to town.

We have talked about the tides in Bristol Bay, so extreme that it looks like someone pulled the plug and left us with mud where the Bay used to be. As the water rises and falls on each tide, channels of water appear and disappear in the mud depending on if the tide is coming in or out.  The water will be deeper in these channels once the tide is in and local knowledge of where the channels are can keep you from running aground on a changing tide. 

 

Gathering tundra fern for lunch

Gathering tundra fern for lunch

Nothing else to do, it was time for lunch. It is handy in Bristol Bay to know what wild food you can forage for dinner. Lettuce other than iceberg is often a mythological creature up here. A bunch of tundra fern sautéed in butter and garlic is far from roughing it and the brightly colored greens are a true taste of this place.

As it turns out we had to wait six hours for a high tide before we could leave Nushagak Point. Once again we were thankful for the sunny day and the beauty and bounty of the place we call home in the summer.

Leaving Nushagak Point at high tide, a setnet fishing village in the background

Leaving Nushagak Point at high tide, a setnet fishing village in the background

First day of filming, Part one: running out

On Thursday night, June 6th our camera man arrived in Dillingham. We shook him out of his bunk early Friday morning as time is tight with fishing season drawing nearer. We were on the water by 5am. The good thing about getting up early? Check out these amazing sunrise photos and you will know.

Leaving Dillingham at 5am on the way to Nushagak Point for our first day of filming

Leaving Dillingham at 5am on the way to Nushagak Point for our first day of filming

Here comes the sun, still on the way to Nushagak Point

Here comes the sun, still on the way to Nushagak Point

Sammy is taking us to his summer home. 

Sammy is taking us to his summer home. 

Sammy is taking us to his summer home out on Nushagak Point. He’s worked Bristol Bay for two decades. He inherited his set net site from his dad. By the time we land the sun is fully up. When you are running your boat at dusk, dark or dawn the watery space you move through is like a cocoon. You are wrapped in the space and nothing exists past the few feet of visibility you have.  Sunrise magically opens up the sky and the world around you opens up with it. It is crazy how the sky and the water are the same gold and black tones with splashes of blue. At certain times of day you can't tell where one starts and the other ends.

We find Nushagak Point just as we remembered it from last year.  Wild, rugged and like no one has ever been here. You can see that ribbon of beach where we pulled boat ashore in greater detail in the next blog post, First day of filming, Part Two: climbing. Stand by for more...

Nushagak Point sunrise

Nushagak Point sunrise

Preseason: Hanging net while you hurry up and wait

It’s preseason here in Bristol Bay. Everyone is hanging gear and getting ready for the fish to show up. Lots of rumors about the number of fish in the river. We have to wait until enough fish swim up the river to spawn before we can go fishing. In fisheries management this is called escapement. It is one of the tools used to manage the salmon fishery and keep it sustainable.

Net hanging tools

Net hanging tools

Xander carefully hangs gear

Xander carefully hangs gear

So, for right now, we mend our nets and talk about fish.  We wait for our turn to swim up the river. Now, we are all friends sitting around fires and talking about our winters just passed and our up coming summer. We all know that soon we will be competitors, each of us wanting to catch as much or more fish as the other guy. No matter how much we may compete on the water if anyone ever needed help, everyone would have your back.  Fishing in the Bay is a brotherhood. As soon as you fish, you are initiated into this brotherhood. 

Here's a series of pictures that shows different fishermen at work hanging their nets. 

The  F/V Sound and The Furry crew hard at work

The  F/V Sound and The Furry crew hard at work

Roby Lebovic hangs his own gear. Some skippers do it themselves, others pay someone else to do it.

Roby Lebovic hangs his own gear. Some skippers do it themselves, others pay someone else to do it.

Hanging gear is mathematical and three dimensional

Hanging gear is mathematical and three dimensional

Pete Cannon hangs his own gear on a sunny evening. Don't forget we have the midnight sun this time of year.

Pete Cannon hangs his own gear on a sunny evening. Don't forget we have the midnight sun this time of year.

Pete Cannon again, making progress

Pete Cannon again, making progress

Rainy Day Blessing of the Fleet

On Sunday the local churches blessed the fleet. They also read the names of all the fishermen lost at sea or because of fishing related injury. A bell was rung for each person. There were 98 names just from this port. It really makes me think about how dangerous our job is. There aren’t too many other ways to make a living where they have a ceremony to remember the lost victims of that profession. Imagine if it was law firm or corporate offices, ‘so and so was killed from a paper cut or from boredom.’

 

Blessing the fleet and honoring the lost are a part of each fishing season

Blessing the fleet and honoring the lost are a part of each fishing season